Henry Rollins on the importance of archiving punk-rock ephemera:

At first I started pulling flyers down off walls or wherever because I love the artwork. Everything’s cut out and crazy and just free and you’re like, “Wow, I’ve been to that show, man. This is me.” And Ian [MacKaye’s] band, The Teen Idles, Jeff Nelson, the drummer, great graphic design. He would make these amazing flyers. He spent days on them. I’d grab two or three of ‘em.
Because you’d read a review of The Teen Idles in some local paper, and you could tell that the rock critic, he realizes his world’s gonna change. And he’s a little bitter on the way out. “This band is a bunch of [grumble grumble].” And I realized they don’t want these bands to exist. They want this history to be erased. I’m going to keep any memorable trace of this music.”

Read more from his recent talk at the Smithsonian here.
Photo: Washington Post writer Chris Richards and Henry Rollins at the Smithsonian’s Baird Auditorium, D.C., Oct. 14. Credit: WAMU/Ally Schweitzer

Henry Rollins on the importance of archiving punk-rock ephemera:

At first I started pulling flyers down off walls or wherever because I love the artwork. Everything’s cut out and crazy and just free and you’re like, “Wow, I’ve been to that show, man. This is me.” And Ian [MacKaye’s] band, The Teen Idles, Jeff Nelson, the drummer, great graphic design. He would make these amazing flyers. He spent days on them. I’d grab two or three of ‘em.

Because you’d read a review of The Teen Idles in some local paper, and you could tell that the rock critic, he realizes his world’s gonna change. And he’s a little bitter on the way out. “This band is a bunch of [grumble grumble].” And I realized they don’t want these bands to exist. They want this history to be erased. I’m going to keep any memorable trace of this music.”

Read more from his recent talk at the Smithsonian here.

Photo: Washington Post writer Chris Richards and Henry Rollins at the Smithsonian’s Baird Auditorium, D.C., Oct. 14. Credit: WAMU/Ally Schweitzer

Christina Billotte of Slant 6:

"I remember having a conversation with Ian MacKaye before we started recording, and I said, ‘I want to make a record like this Kinks record! Every single song is good!’ And he kept saying, ‘Well, you know­­­­–’ And I kept saying, ‘You know what I mean?’ And finally he said, ‘That’s a greatest hits record.’”

More from our conversation with Billotte at bandwidth.fm.

Christina Billotte of Slant 6:

"I remember having a conversation with Ian MacKaye before we started recording, and I said, ‘I want to make a record like this Kinks record! Every single song is good!’ And he kept saying, ‘Well, you know­­­­–’ And I kept saying, ‘You know what I mean?’ And finally he said, ‘That’s a greatest hits record.’”

More from our conversation with Billotte at bandwidth.fm.